Car and Motorcycle Fatally Collide on South Carolina’s I-95

Thursday was a tragic day on Interstate 95 after a tractor trailer and a Kawasaki motorcycle collided. The bike, driven by 20-year-old Joshua Wilson Pinilla, hit the back of a car. He was then thrown from his motorcycle and the tractor trailer ran over him.

At approximately 5:00pm close to the Sheridan Street exist, Pinilla was pronounced dead. The driver of the truck and the car were not injured in the accident.

As a result of the crash, there was a significant traffic jam, as three lanes were closed for cleanup and investigation. Investigators talked to witnesses and surveyed the wreckage before clearing the scene.

Pinilla is described as both a motorcycle and a car enthusiast. He was on his 2009 Kawasaki motorcycle going south on the highway. He rear-ended Doracy DeMagalhaes-Burns’ 2008 Chrysler.

After his bike hit the back of the Chrysler, he was catapulted into the air and the truck Gregory Barrington Henry was driving, a 2001 Freightliner Truck, hit Pinilla.

The media reached out to the parents and other family members of Pinilla after the accident. They did not respond and appear to understandably want their privacy at this time.

However, George Pinilla, the victim’s father, wrote about his son on his son’s Facebook page to express his sadness over this tragedy. He wrote, “Rest in peace my son. I love you so much, I wish God would have taken me instead. You have no idea how much I love you. I miss you and I would give my life for you.”

Pinilla went to Weston’s Cypress Bay High School. He was a frequent part of the local motorcycle community and belonged to several online groups for this purpose. He was a member of a group that works to promote motorcycle safety and raise awareness about motorcycle accidents in South Florida, known as Rider Down.

Pinilla shared his last photo on his Facebook page on February 9, 2016. The photo was of his black Kawasaki motorcycle and the caption that does with the photo read, “Because new exhaust…”

“When loved ones get a call that there has been an accident, their first and only thought is how the victim is doing. Issues of liability are the furthest thing from their mind,” says Joe and Martin, attorney and managing partner at a top South Carolina personal injury firm. “This is where I come in. I want the victim and their family to focus on what is most important and I am there to help them deal with the legal aspects of the situation.”

Authorities are still investigating this case to determine the cause of this fatal accident. At this time, the family of Pinilla are maintaining their privacy and mourning their loved one in private. Police department is willing to accept all the information and the help they can get from eye witness and they hope this will be resolve soon. It is unknown how long it will take to complete the investigation to bring this tragic accident to a conclusion.

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Don’t Miss the Cutoff: Understanding the Statute of Limitations

Many people know there’s a statute of limitations for criminal cases. Whether they’ve heard it mentioned on a prime time law procedural or read about it in regards to the numerous Bill Cosby sexual assault articles, the statute of limitations is often a bone of contention or a needle in the side of a litigate prosecutor. It may come as a surprise, however, that civil law also has its own statute of limitations. Not only do criminal and civil law have their own statute of limitations, but both criminal and civil law statute of limitations can vary from state to state. This is why it is always important to report a crime or speak with a New York personal injury attorney as soon as possible.

For the purposes of this article, we’ll be using the New York statute of limitations  as an example. Let’s start off with a simple Personal Injury issue – assault. Now, assault is one of those infractions that can be tried in both criminal and civil court, however the statute of limitations varies widely. Someone can be charged with criminal assault up to six years from the date of the alleged assault. On the other hand, a civil case must be filed within one year of an assault. That means someone could be tried under personal injury law for an assault before they ever face criminal charges.

Similarly, while manslaughter cases can be charged up to five years after an incident and murder has no time limitation, a wrongful death suit must be filed within two years of the death. False imprisonment charges must be filed within one year of the incident, while kidnapping charges must be brought within five in some cases. While civil cases may end up in court before a criminal court, it is also possible that a defendant be found liable for an assault, for example, but acquitted of criminal charges because of the difference between the burden of proof in criminal and civil court cases.

One of the most famous cases where an individual was acquitted of criminal charges but found responsible for the wrongful death of two people is the O.J. Simpson case. Nicknamed the “Trial of the Century,” Simpson’s case involved television cameras, a tight glove, a possibly racist cop, a white bronco, and a freeloading house guest. The public was enthralled with the coverage and sensationalism. Many were surprised when the jury came back with a not guilty verdict for the former football player. A civil suit, however, ended with a finding for the plaintiffs, the families of Nicole Brown Simpson, Simpson’s former wife, and Ronald Goldman.

Most personal injury cases have a time limit of three years from the accident. Because of the tight restrictions for bringing a case to trial, it is extremely important to see a New York personal injury lawyer as soon as possible after an accident. A trustworthy New York personal injury attorney will most likely offer a free consultation to help you determine whether to move forward with your case and help you understand how the judicial system works.

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